shiyakujin no hokora
A Book of Little Traditions
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ToCjinja shintô

jinja shintô (Shrine shintô) – 06 / 14 / 2014
jinja shintô じんじゃしんとう 神社神道
jin (that which inspires feelings of reverence, awe, gratitude, fear/terror)
ja (shrine, place, office)
jinja (shrine)
shin (that which inspires feelings of reverence, awe, gratitude, fear/terror)
tô | dô(way)
shintô (indigenous-based spiritual practices mainly engaged in by many of the people of Japan)
jinja shintô (shrine shintô)

❖ jinja shintô is the most visible form, and has always been a part of Japan's history as a country. It is associated in the popular mind with seasonal festivals, rituals of passage, purification rites, groundbreaking ceremonies, good luck charms, making wishes, and showing support for the emperor and the nation of Japan.
The Three Principles – The 3 main principles that most of jinja shintô adheres to
jinja and jingû – More common terms for shintô shrines
omairi – Shrine visits
taisai – Shrine rites
tôja – Shrine buildings
gosaijin ごさいじん 御祭神
gosaishin ごさいしん
go (honorable)
sai (ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)
jin | kami (that which inspires feelings of reverence, awe, gratitude, fear/terror)
gosaijin (honorable enshrined kami)

go (honorable)
sai (ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)
shin | kami (that which inspires feelings of reverence, awe, gratitude, fear/terror)
gosaishin (honorable enshrined kami)

❖ Also pronounced gosaishin
❖ Also called saijin, saishin
saijin さいじん 祭神
saishin さいしん
sai (ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)
jin | kami (that which inspires feelings of reverence, awe, gratitude, fear/terror)
saijin (enshrined kami)

sai (ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)
shin | kami (that which inspires feelings of reverence, awe, gratitude, fear/terror)
saishin (enshrined kami)

❖ Also pronounced saishin
ujiko うじこ 氏子
uji (clan, family name, surname)
ko (child)
ujiko (shrine parishioner)
❖ Someone who is on the shrine's member rolls
❖ Shrines frequently list all people born within their area
This book will not go into great detail on jinja shintô, except as it pertains to minzoku shintô. Information on jinja shintô is readily available from other websites.

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