shiyakujin no hokora
A Book of Little Traditions
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ToCminzoku shintôsekai-kanmatsurinenchû gyoji

nenchû gyoji (Annual Events) – 06 / 24 / 2014
nenchû gyoji ねんちゅうぎょじ 年中御璽
nen (year)
chû (in, inside)
nenchû (whole year; all year round; throughout the year)
gyo (honorable, manipulate, govern)
ji (emperor's seal)
gyoji (imperial seal, privy seal)

❖ Ethnographic term meaning: traditional observances repeated as a matter of custom in the same manner and style, and at the same point in the annual calendar
go-sekku ごせっく 五節句
go (five)
sek | setsu (node, season, occasion)
ku (words, phrase, clause, sentence, passage, paragraph)
sekku (seasonal festival)

❖ The five seasonal festivals
❖ Of Buddhist origin
nanakusa no sekku (Jan 7th)
momo no sekku (March 3rd)
tango no sekku (May 5th)
tanabata (July 7th)
kiku-no-sekku (September 9th)
haru matsuri はるまつり 春祭
haru (springtime, spring)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Spring festivals
❖ February 4 – May 5
hina matsuri ひなまつり 雛祭
hina (doll)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ doll festival / girls' festival / peach festival
❖ One of the go-sekku
❖ March 3
❖ Also called joshi no sekku, jôshi, jômi, momo no sekku
joshi no sekku じょし 女子の節句
jôshi じょうし 上巳
jômi じょうみ
momo no sekku もものせっく 桃の節句
jo (female, woman)
shi (child)
no (possesive particle)
sek | setsu (node, season, occasion)
ku (words, phrase, clause, sentence, passage, paragraph)
sekku (seasonal festival)

jô (up, above)
shi (sign of the snake or serpent, sixth sign of Chinese zodiac, April*)

jô (up, above)
mi (sign of the snake or serpent, sixth sign of Chinese zodiac, April*)

momo (peach)
no (possesive particle)
sek | setsu (node, season, occasion)
ku (words, phrase, clause, sentence, passage, paragraph)
sekku (seasonal festival)

* In the lunarsolar calendar April is the third month which was shifted to March with the change to the solar calendar
higan ひがん 彼岸
hi (that, the)
gan (beach)
higan (other shore)

❖ (See higan)
❖ Equinoctial week
❖ Centered around shunbun
❖ (See haru no higan)
shunbun しゅんぶん 春分
shun (spring)
bun (share, part, segment)

❖ Vernal equinox; spring equinox
❖ Between March 19 and 21
❖ (See shunbun-no-hi)
ki matsuri きまつり 木祭
ki (tree, wood)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Tree festival
❖ 1st Sunday in April
ki matsuri きまつり 奇祭
ki (strange, strangeness, curiosity)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Strange festival with bizarre or unusual ritual
❖ These can occur throughout the year
busshô-e ぶっしょうえ 仏生会
bus | butsu (buddha)
shô (birth, life)
e (meeting, party)

❖ Buddha's birthday festival
❖ April 8
❖ Also called gôtan-e, hana-eshiki, kanbutsu-e, ryûge-e, yokubutsu-e
gôtan-e ごうたんえ 降誕会
hana-eshiki はなえしき 花会式
kanbutsu-e かんぶつえ 灌仏会
ryûge-e りゅうげえ 龍華会
yokubutsu-e よくぶつえ 浴仏会
gô (descend, precipitate, fall, surrender)
tan (nativity, be born)
e (meeting, party)

hana (flower)
e (meeting, party)
shiki (ceremony, rite)
eshiki (memorial service, temple service)

kan (pour)
butsu (buddha)
e (meeting, party)

ryû (dragon, imperial)
ge | ke (splendor, flower, petal, shine, luster, ostentatious, showy, gay, gorgeous)
e (meeting, party)

yoku (bath)
butsu (buddha)
e (meeting, party)
hana matsuri はなまつり 花祭
hana (flower)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Flower festival
❖ April 8
kodomo-no-hi こどものひ 子供の日
ko (child)
domo (present, serve (meal), accompany)
no (possessive particle)
hi (day, sun)

❖ Children's day
❖ A day to celebrate the happiness of children and to express gratitude toward mothers
❖ May 5
tango no sekku たんごのせっく 端午節句
端午の節句
tan (edge, origin)
go (noon)
no (implied possessive particle)
sek | setsu (node, season, period)
ku (phrase, passage)
sekku (seasonal festival)

tan (edge, origin)
go (noon)
no (possessive particle)
sek | setsu (node, season, period)
ku (phrase, passage)
sekku (seasonal festival)

❖ Boys' festival
❖ The beginning of summer
❖ One of the go-sekku
❖ May 5
❖ Also called tango
tango たんご 端午
端五
tan (edge, origin)
go (noon)

tan (edge, origin)
go (five)
natsu matsuri なつまつり 夏祭
natsu (summer)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Summer festivals
❖ May 6 – August 7
aoi matsuri あおいまつり 葵祭
aoi (hollyhock)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Hollyhock festival – prayers for a abundant grain harvests
❖ Usually about May 15
geshi げし 夏至
ge (summer)
shi (climax, arrive, reach, attain)
geshi (summer solstice, midsummer)

❖ Geshi occurs between June 20 and 22
❖ Also called geshi-no-hi
geshi-no-hi げしのひ 夏至の日
ge (summer)
shi (climax, arrive, reach, attain)
no (possessive particle)
hi (day, sun)
geshi-no-hi (day of the summer solstice)
geshisai げしさい 夏至祭
ge (summer)
shi (climax, arrive, reach, attain)
sai (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)
geshisai (midsummer festival, midsummer feast)
sei-geshi せいげし 聖夏至
sei (holy, sacred, pure)
ge (summer)
shi (climax, arrive, reach, attain)
sei-gashi (midsummer wellwishing)

❖ "sei-geshi to you and yours..."
ooharae matsuri おおはらえまつり 大祓祭
oo (great, large, big)
hara.e (exorcise, purification)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Great Purification rite, a ceremony performed to cast out the tsumi and impurities of the entire population, ooharae is performed regularly on the last day of June and December
❖ The ooharae-no-kotoba is read on these dates
❖ It may also be performed on special occasions when required, such as at times of pestilence or disaster, or before the advent of a major festival
❖ (See chi-no-wa, hitogata)
❖ June 30
❖ Also December 31 (See toshikoshi-no-harae)
❖ Also called oharai matsuri, nagoshi-no-harae, nagoshi no ooharae, nagoshi no ooharai
oharai matsuri おはらいまつり 御祓い祭
お祓い祭
nagoshi-no-harae なごしのはらえ 夏越の祓
nagoshi no ooharae なごしのおおはらえ 夏越しの祓
nagoshi no ooharai なごしのおおはらい 名越しの祓
o (honorable - written with kanji or hiragana)
hara.i (exorcise, purification)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

na | natsu (summer)
go.shi (cross over, move to)
nago.shi (beginning of summer)
no (possessive particle)
hara.e (exorcise, purification)

na (noted, distinguished)
go.shi (cross over, move to)
nago.shi (beginning of summer)
no (possessive particle)
oo (implied – great, large, big)
hara.e (exorcise, purification)

na (noted, distinguished)
go.shi (cross over, move to)
nago.shi (beginning of summer)
no (possessive particle)
oo (implied – great, large, big)
hara.i (exorcise, purification)
gion matsuri ぎおんまつり 祇園祭
gi (national or local god, peaceful, great)
on (park, garden, yard, farm)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Originated in kyôto as part of a purification ritual to appease the kami thought to cause fire, floods and earthquakes
❖ All of July, especially July 14 - 17
gion ぎおん 祇園
gi (national or local god, peaceful, great)
on (park, garden)

❖ A term referring to kami (chiefly susanoo-no-mikoto) enshrined in the yasaka jinja in kyôto, and worshiped for their abilities to cast out and purify evil
tanabata たなばた 七夕
棚幡
棚機
織女
All these are pronounced tanabata:
shichi (seven)
yû (evening)

tana (shelf, ledge, rack, mount, mantle, trellis)
bata | hata (flag)

tana (shelf, ledge, rack, mount, mantle, trellis)
bata | hata (mechanism, machine)

o.ri (weave, fabric)
me (female, woman)

❖ Festival of the Weaver
❖ Star Festival
❖ Based on the love-story of orihime (weaver princess) and kengyû (cattle-herder) being seperated by her father and allowed to meet only one day a year
❖ One of the go-sekku
❖ July 7
aki matsuri あきまつり 秋祭
aki (autumn, fall)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Autumn festivals
❖ August 8 – November 6
hatsuho はつほ 初穂
初穗
hatsu (first time, beginning)
ho (ear, ear (grain), head)

hatsu (first time, beginning)
ho (ear (of grain), head)

❖ (first ears of rice or crops or harvest of the season, offering to kami)
❖ The best ears of grain are removed and presented to kami as an offering
❖ hatsuho has come to mean any offering presented to kami
❖ Occurs around mid-August
kiku-no-sekku きくのせっく 菊の節句
kiku (chrysanthemum)
no (possessive particle)
sek | setsu (node, season, period, occasion)
ku (words, phrase, clause, sentence, passage, paragraph)
sekku (seasonal festival)

❖ Chrysanthemum festival
❖ One of the go-sekku
❖ September 9
❖ Also called chô-yô
chô-yô ちょうよう 重陽
chô (heavy, heap up, pile up)
yô (sunshine, yang principle, positive, male, heaven, daytime)
higan ひがん 彼岸
hi (that, the)
gan (beach)
higan (other shore)

❖ (See higan)
❖ Equinoctial week
❖ Centered around shûbun
❖ (See aki no higan)
shûbun しゅうぶん 秋分
shû (autumn)
bun (share, part, segment)
❖ Autumnal equinox, autumn equinox, fall equinox
❖ Between September 22 and 24
❖ (See shûbun-no-hi)
October
❖ The tenth month in the traditional Japanese lunarsolar calendar — November
❖ With the adoption of the Gregorian calendar it was shifted to October
❖ According to Japanese tradition, all kami meet in izumo each year in October
❖ October is known around izumo as kamiarizuki
❖ (See rusugami)

kami (that which inspires feelings of reverence, gratitude, awe, or terror)
ari (exists, located in)
zuki (month, moon)
(month with kami)

❖ October is known everywhere else in Japan as kannazuki
kan- (kami)
na. (none, nothing, not)
zuki (month, moon)
(month without kami)
alternatively: if na is used as ateji (phonetically)
kan- (kami)
na (possesive particle)
zuki (month, moon)
(month with kami)

❖ Also called kaminazuki, kaminashizuki
kamiarizuki かみありづき 神在月
kannazuki かんなづき 神無月
kaminazuki かみなづき
kaminashizuki かみなしづき
kan- (kami)
na. (none, nothing, not) – See alternate translation above
zuki (month, moon)

kami (that which inspires feelings of reverence, awe, gratitude, fear/terror)
na. (none, nothing, not) – See alternate translation above
zuki (month, moon)

kami (that which inspires feelings of reverence, awe, gratitude, fear/terror)
na.shi (without)
zuki (month, moon)
October 15th, 16th, 17th – Harvest thanksgiving
❖ Offering the first fruits to amaterasu omikami
October 15th & 16th – At the geku (outer shrine)
October 16th & 17th – At the naiku (inner shrine)
fuyu matsuri ふゆまつり 冬祭
fuyu (winter)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Winter festivals
❖ November 7 - February 3
niiname sai にいなめさい 新嘗祭
nii (new)
na.me (taste)
sai (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Offerings of the first fruits of the year's grain harvest and partaking thereof
❖ November 23 & 24
tôji とうじ 冬至
tô (winter)
ji | shi (climax, arrive, reach, attain)
tôji (winter solstice, midwinter)

❖ tôji occurs between December 21 and 22
❖ Also called tôji-no-hi
tôji-no-hi とうじのひ 冬至の日
tô (winter)
ji | shi (climax, arrive, reach, attain)
no (possessive particle)
hi (day, sun)
tôji-no-hi (day of the winter solstice)
sei-tôji せいとうじ 聖冬至
sei (holy, sacred, pure)
tô (winter)
ji | shi (climax, arrive, reach, attain)
sei-tôji (midwinter wellwishing)

❖ "sei-tôji to you and yours..."
tôjisai とうじさい 冬至祭
tô (winter)
ji | shi (climax, arrive, reach, attain)
sai (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)
tôjisai (midwinter festival, midwinter feast)
okera matsuri おけらまつり 白朮祭
shiro (white)
okera (a type of herb, atractylodes japonica)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ People catch the sacred flame of okera, which is a medical herb, with a little rope; swinging the rope all the way to home
❖ The fire for the first meal of the family is lit with this flame
❖ The flame is used to ward off evil forces and the negative energy of the past year
❖ December 31, New Years Eve
toshikoshi-no-harae としこしのはらえ 年越の祓
toshi (year)
koshi (cross over, move to)
no (possessive particle)
hara.e (exorcise, purification)

❖ December 31
❖ (See ooharae matsuri)
❖ Also ooharae, toshikoshi ooharae, toshikoshi oharai, shiwasu ooharai
ooharae おおはらえ 大祓
toshikoshi ooharae としこしおおはらえ 年越大祓
toshikoshi oharai としこしおはらい 年越御祓
shiwasu ooharai しわすおおはらい 師走大祓
oo (great, large, big)
hara.e (exorcise, purification)
ooharae (great purification)

toshi (year)
koshi (cross over, move to)
oo (great, large, big)
hara.e (exorcise, purification)

toshi (year)
koshi (cross over, move to)
o (honorable)
hara.i (exorcise, purification)

shi (teacher, expert)
wasu | ha (subject particle) sô (run)
shiwasu (name for 12th lunar month – literally: teacher run)
oo (great, large, big)
hara.i (exorcise, purification)
o-shôgatsu おしょうがつ 御正月
お正月
o (honorable) – written with kanji or hiragana
shô (correct, justice, righteous)
gatsu (month, moon)
shôgatsu (New Year, New Year's Day, the first month, January)

❖ January 1-7
hatsuhinode はつひので 初日の出
hatsu (first time, beginning)
hi (day, sun)
no (possessive particle)
-de (exit, leave)

❖ Celebration of the first sunrise of the new year
❖ Jaunuary 1
hatsumôde はつもうで 初詣
hatsu (first time, beginning)
mô.de (visit a shrine)

❖ Initial visit to a shrine at the first of the year to pray for happiness and divine protection during the coming year
kadomatsu かどまつ 門松
kado (gate)
matsu (pine tree)

❖ A traditional Japanese decoration of the New Year placed in pairs in front of homes supposedly to welcome ancestral spirits or kami of the harvest
❖ They are placed after Christmas until January 7 and are considered shintai
❖ They are ritually burned on January 15
❖ (See shimeyaki shinji)
jinjitsu じんじつ 人日
jin (person)
jitsu (day, sun)

❖ One of the go-sekku
❖ January 7
❖ Also called nanakusa-no-sekku
nanakusa-no-sekku ななくさのせっく 七種の節句
七草の節句
nana (seven)
kusa (species, kind, variety, seed)
no (possesive particle)
sek | setsu (node, season, occasion)
ku (words, phrase, clause, sentence, passage, paragraph)
sekku (seasonal festival)

nana (seven)
kusa (grass, weeds, herbs)
no (possesive particle)
sek | setsu (node, season, occasion)
ku (words, phrase, clause, sentence, passage, paragraph)
sekku (seasonal festival)

❖ Festival of seven herbs
yuki matsuri ゆきまつり 雪祭
yuki (snow)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Snow festival
❖ January 14 & 15
ta-asobi たあそび 田遊
田遊び
ta (rice field, rice paddy)
aso.bi (play)

❖ Ritual pantomime of the year's rice-cycle
❖ Performed at the first full moon of the new year to divine a good harvest
setsubun-sai せつぶんさい 節分祭
setsu (node, period, season)
bun (part, segment, share)
sai (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Last day of winter
❖ Beans are thrown with the words oni wa soto, fuku wa uchi
鬼は外、福は内
❖ Literally: oni (ogre, demon, ghost*) is outside, (good) fortune is inside
(* oni also carries the meaning of fierce, relentless, merciless)
❖ Roasted soybeans are eaten for good luck
(one for each of your years plus one for the coming year)
❖ February 3
❖ (See oni)
akutai matsuri あくたい 悪態祭
aku (bad, false, evil, wrong)
tai (voice, attitude)
akutai (abusive language)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Cursing festivals
akko matsuri あっこまつり 悪口祭
惡口祭
a. (bad, false, evil, wrong)
a. (bad, evil)
kô (mouth) – out-dated kanji
akko (abuse, insult, slander, evil speaking, bad mouth)

❖ Bad-mouthing festival
December 14 – Trade insults with each other and a 'tengu'
December 31 – Two groups hurl abuse at each other (See shôreisai)
January 5 – Trade insults with each other
hi matsuri ひまつり 火祭
hi (fire, flame, blaze)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Fire festivals
❖ Frequently associated with midwinter or new years
o-hitaki おひたき お火焚
御火焚
御火焼
o (honorable) – written with kanji or hiragana
hi (fire)
taki (burn, kindle, build a fire)

o (honorable)
hi (fire)
taki | yaki (burning)

❖ Festival held on the 11th lunar month with bonfires at shrines
❖ A thanksgiving event for the harvest
❖ November 8 or December 8
❖ Also (fire-burning) on tôji
❖ Also called ohitaki taisai, o-hotaki
ohitaki taisai おひたきたいさい お火焚大祭
o-hotaki おほたき お火焚
o (honorable)
hi (fire)
taki (burn, kindle, build a fire)
tai (great, large, big)
sai (ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship

o (honorable)
ho (fire)
taki (burn, kindle, build a fire)
hitaki ひたき 火焚
火焚き
火焼
火焼き
hi (fire)
ta.ki (burn, kindle, build a fire)

hi (fire)
taki | yaki (burning)

❖ Building a fire
shôreisai しょれいさい 松例祭
shô (pine tree)
rei (custom)
sai (ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)
reisai (annual festival)

❖ (Pine Festival)
❖ Held on the night of New Year's Eve
❖ Involving either pine torches or a bonfire
❖ Two groups engage in various contests to divine whether the coming year will bring good harvests
dondoyaki どんどやき どんど焚
どんど焼
dondo (onomatopoeic or mimetic word – rapidly, steadily)
taki (burn, kindle, build a fire)

dondo (onomatopoeic or mimetic word – rapidly, steadily)
taki | yaki (burning)

❖ A bonfire in which the New Year's gateway decorations are burned on koshôgatsu
❖ Usually on the 15th day of the new year
koshôgatsu こしょうがつ 小正月
ko (little, small)
shô (correct, justice, righteous)
gatsu (month, moon)
shôgatsu (New Year, New Year's Day, the first month, January)

❖ (Little New Year)
❖ The 14th-16th days of the lunar New Year
sagichô matsuri さぎちょうまつり 左義長祭
sa (left)
gi (righteousness, justice, morality, honor, loyalty, meaning)
chô (long, leader)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ (sagichô appears to be name whose origin is unknown)
❖ Fire festival involving assembling, stacking, and burning the pine new year's door ornaments of each household at a set location such as the village border, the village square, or a particular field
❖ Usually held on january 15
shimeyaki shinji しめやきしんじ 締焼神事
shi.me (shut, tighten, tie, lock, fasten)
yaki (burning)
shin (kami)
ji (matter, thing, fact, business)

❖ A bonfire in which the New Year's gateway decorations, old ofuda, omamori, and shrine decorations are ritually burned after being purified
❖ January 15
bon matsuri ぼんまつり 盆祭
bon (lantern festival, basin, tray)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Festivals for the dead
❖ A Japanese Buddhist custom
haka mairi はかまいり 墓参
墓参り
bosan ぼさん 墓参
haka (gravesite, tomb)
mai.ri (visit - to a religious site, e.g. shrine, temple, grave)

❖ Visit to a family gravesite to clean it and make offerings
❖ Also pronounced bosan
❖ Also called o-haka mairi
o-haka mairi おはかまいり 御墓参
御墓参り
お墓参
お墓参り
o (honorific prefix - written with kanji or hiragana)
haka (gravesite, tomb)
mai.ri (visit - to a religious site, e.g. shrine, temple, grave)
higan ひがん 彼岸
hi (that, the)
gan (beach)
higan (other shore)

❖ Equinoctial weeks
❖ (See haru no higan, aki no higan)
❖ Occurs twice a year and each lasts one week, with the vernal equinox and autumn equinox occurring in the middle of their respective weeks
❖ During this period, it is customary for Buddhists to visit temples to renew their dedication to Buddhism
❖ A Buddhist term, higan refers to "the other side of the river crossed by the dead"
❖ Buddhists also visit the graves of their departed to comfort the spirits of the ancestors on the other side – bringing flowers, incense, water or the departed's favorite food as an offering and greet the departed to report on their well-being (See haka mairi)
❖ Also called o-higan
o-higan おひがん 御彼岸
お彼岸
o (honorable) – written with kanji or hiragana
hi (that, the)
gan (beach)
higan (other shore)
higan-e ひがんえ 彼岸会
hi (that, the)
gan (beach)
higan (other shore)
e (meeting, meet)

❖ Buddhist services during the equinoctial week
higan no
chûnichi
ひがんの
ちゅうにち
彼岸の
中日
hi (that, the)
gan (beach)
higan (other shore)
no (possessive particle)
chû (middle, in, inside, middle, center)
nichi (day, sun, counter for days)

❖ The middle day of higan (the equinoctial week)
❖ (See shunbun-no-hi, shûbun-no-hi)
haru no higan はるのひがん 春の彼岸
haru (springtime, spring)
no (possessive particle)
hi (that, the)
gan (beach)
higan (other shore)

❖ higan of Spring
shunbun-no-hi しゅんぶんのひ 春分の日
shun (spring)
bun (part, segment, share)
no (possessive particle)
hi (day, sun)

❖ Day of the vernal equinox
❖ (See shunbun)
❖ shunbun-no-hi occurs between March 19 and 21
❖ The week in which shunbun-no-hi is the middle day is called the spring equinoctial week (higan)
❖ (See higan no chûnichi)
botamochi ぼたもち 牡丹餅
bo (male)
ta (rust colored, red)
bota (tree peony)
mochi (pounded-rice cake)

❖ (peony mochi)
❖ Red azuki bean mochi
❖ A traditional japanese pastry made by cooking glutinous rice, pounding it into a paste, and molding this into balls, which are filled with azuki bean jam, and dusted with soybean flour
❖ Made in the home to offer to the spirits of the ancestors
aki no higan あきのひがん 秋の彼岸
aki (autumn, fall)
no (possessive particle)
hi (that, the)
gan (beach)
higan (other shore)

❖ higan of Autumn
shûbun-no-hi しゅうぶんのひ 秋分の日
shû (autumn, fall)
bun (part, segment, share)
no (possessive particle)
hi (day, sun)

❖ Day of the autumn equinox
❖ (See shûbun)
❖ shûbun-no-hi occurs between September 22 and 24
❖ The week in which shûbun-no-hi is the middle day is called the autumn equinoctial week (higan)
❖ (See higan no chûnichi)
higanbana ひがんばな 彼岸花
hi (that, the)
gan (beach)
higan (other shore, equinoctal week)
bana | hana (flower, bloom, blossom, petal)

❖ (equinox flower)
❖ Red amaryllis, red spider lily; cluster belladonna; cluster amaryllis
❖ Also called manjushage
manjushage まんじゅしゃげ 曼珠沙華
manjusaka まんじゅさか
man (wide, beautiful)
ju | shu (pearl, gem, jewel)
sha | sa (sand)
ge | ke (splendor, flower, petal, shine, luster, ostentatious, showy, gay, gorgeous)

man (wide, beautiful)
ju | shu (pearl, gem, jewel)
sa (sand)
ka (splendor, flower, petal, shine, luster, ostentatious, showy, gay, gorgeous)

❖ Also pronounced manjusaka
o-hagi おはぎ 御萩
お萩
o (honorable) – written with kanji or hiragana
hagi (bush clover)

❖ Mochi covered with bean jam
❖ The name comes from an autumnal flower
❖ A traditional japanese pastry made by mixing together and cooking glutinous and nonglutinous rice, lightly squashing and molding this into balls, which are covered with bean jam, or else soybean flour or sesame seeds
❖ Made in the home to offer to the spirits of the ancestors
obon matsuri おぼんまつり 御盆祭
お盆祭
o (honorable)
bon (lantern festival, basin, tray)
matsuri (festival, feast, ritual, offer prayers, celebrate, deify, enshrine, worship)

❖ Festival to console the spirits of the dead ancestors
❖ On the 13th, a fire called mukae-bi is burned at the entrance of each house; the spirits of the dead ancestors are welcomed into the house and offerings are made to them on the butsudan
❖ On the 15th, another fire called okuri-bi is burned to send off the spirits of the dead ancestors on their return, or lanterns are floated down a river
kyû bon きゅうぼん 旧盆
kyû (old times, old things)
bon (lantern festival, basin, tray)

❖ (old bon)
❖ 15th day of the seventh month of the lunar calendar, and so differs each year
shichigatsu bon しちがつぼん 七月盆
shichi (seven)
gatsu (moon, month)
bon (lantern festival, basin, tray)

❖ July 15 on the solar calendar
❖ (Chin: ullambana)
❖ Also called urabon, urabon-e
urabon うらぼん 于蘭盆
盂蘭盆
urabon-e うらぼんえ 于蘭盆会
盂蘭盆会
盂蘭盆會
u (ateji – phonetic-equivalent character)
ra (ateji)
bon (basin, lantern festival, tray)

u (ateji)
ra (ateji)
bon (basin, lantern festival, tray)

u (ateji)
ra (ateji)
bon (basin, lantern festival, tray)
e (meeting, meet, party)

u (ateji)
ra (ateji)
bon (basin, lantern festival, tray)
e (meeting, meet, party)

u (ateji)
ra (ateji)
bon (basin, lantern festival, tray)
e (meet, party)

❖ Sutra on the practice of filial piety
ochûgen おちゅうげん 御中元
お中元
o (honorable) – written with kanji or hiragana
chû (in, inside, middle, mean, center)
gen (beginning, former time, origin)

❖ bon matsuri gifts
hachigatsu bon はちがつぼん 八月盆
hachi (eight)
gatsu (moon, month)
bon (lantern festival, basin, tray)

❖ The most commonly celebrated time
❖ August 15 on the solar calendar
bon odori ぼんおどり 盆踊り
bon (lantern festival, basin, tray)
odo.ri (jump, dance, leap, skip)

❖ Bon dance
mukae-bi むかえび 迎え火
mukae (meeting, greeting, welcoming)
bi (fire, flame, blaze)

❖ Lit on the 13th to welcome the spirits of the dead ancestors
okuri-bi おくりび 送り火
oku.ri (sending off)
bi (fire, flame, blaze)

❖ Lit on the 15th to send the spirits of the dead ancestors off on their return

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